Tag Archives: Alec Couros

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 28 – Digital Storytelling for Beginners

Why is Storytelling Important?

If the idea that storytelling is important is a new one for you, we suggest that you take your 10 minutes today, and explore some of the resources below.

The importance of storytelling has been documented on many levels.  Some of us came through a school system that de-emphasized the importance of stories, and valued the  memorization of facts.  We may need to relearn the power of stories, and how they can play a critical role in our work as educators.

Consider the breadth of the idea of storytelling on Wikipedia.

Explore the importance of storytelling in First Nations Pedagogy.

 

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share-Alike license by Guilia Forsythe.
Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-Commercial – Share-Alike license by Guilia Forsythe.

“When it comes to inspiring people to embrace some strange new change in behaviour, storytelling isn’t just better than the other tools. It’s the only thing that works.”

Steve Denning

Still not convinced?

Check out some of these TED Talks on the topic of storytelling, or this article in The Guardian on the Importance of Storytelling in the Digital Age.

 

Why Is It Important to Tell Our Stories?

Taken from a post by Stephen Hurley. Click the image for the link to the post.
Taken from a post by Stephen Hurley. Click the image for the link to the post.

If we don’t tell our stories, someone else will.  We are doing amazing work in education today. Who are we telling about it?

The importance of taking time to tell our stories is captured in this post by Stephen Hurley:  Telling Tales Out of School: The Stories that Emerge from the Work That We Do.  We hope you will take a few minutes to read it and consider your role in spreading the great stories of public education in Ontario.

Taken from a post by @stephen_hurley. Click the image for the link to the original post.
Taken from a post by @stephen_hurley. Click the image for the link to the original post.

 

Earlier this year, Darren Kuropatwa visited OSSEMOOC to share ideas around Digital Storytelling.  You can access his slides here.

Some of our participants shared their learning in the video below.

 

How can we begin to use digital storytelling in our classrooms?

This example from Kathy Cassidy demonstrates the power of tools available to help even early primary students share their stories.

 

From Kathy Cassidy's post on "Blogging in a Primary Classroom with only One iPad" (click on the image for the link)
From Kathy Cassidy’s post on “Blogging in a Primary Classroom with only One iPad” (click on the image for the link)

 

How can you find out more about Digital Storytelling?  Here is a great starting point: 50+ Web Ways to Tell a Story (by Alan Levine – @cogdog)

What digital storytelling resources or examples do you have to share?

Further Resources:

Digital Storytelling Tools

Digital Storytelling Resources (Dr. Alec Couros – @courosa) -> further resources here as well

Storytelling (David Jakes – @djakes)

Kathy Schrock's Guide to Digital Storytelling (click on the image for the link to the guide)
Kathy Schrock’s Guide to Digital Storytelling (click on the image for the link to the guide)

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 26 – Your Blog as Your Portfolio

Update August 18, 2015:

The Principal Associations in Ontario hosted a second Symposium for Ontario School Leaders on Technology Enabled Learning and Leading.  Dr. Alec Couros was invited to keynote and share learning on blogging as a portfolio.  His shared resources are available here.

___________________________________________________________________

This week, the Principal Associations in Ontario (OPC/CPCO/ADFO) are hosting a symposium for Ontario School Leaders on Technology Enabled Teaching and Learning.  The learning is being shared using the hashtag #ontedleaders .

George Couros has been leading some of the learning by meeting with principals virtually, and by examining the Ontario Leadership Framework.

As well, George has been sharing his ideas around open/visible learning and leadership, and sharing our professional portfolios online as our blogs.

 

Now that you have started to create your own space for sharing learning, consider that your blog can also be your personal portfolio.

How can you set it up?

If you remember in our first blog video, the difference between “posts” and “pages” was discussed.  “Posts” are your regular contributions to your blog – your writing.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.32.32 PM

We add new posts by using the “Add New” option on the left side of the dashboard.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.02.56 PM

 

Pages are listed on your blog and they contain information that normally you don’t change as frequently as your posts.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.32.17 PM

 

We add new pages by hovering over “Pages” and choosing “Add New”.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.03.07 PM

 

We name our page “Ontario Leadership Framework”.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.03.32 PM

Once published, we can see the page on the public side of our blog.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.39.26 PM

 

It is helpful to use subheadings for the different strands of the framework.  It is simple to set up these pages.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.41.33 PM

Once again, we can add a new page.  This time we call it “Setting Directions”.  In the right margin, under parent, we choose our previous page “Ontario Leadership Framework”.  This ensures our new page appears under the main heading.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.40.20 PM

Once published, we see “Setting Directions” under the Ontario Leadership Framework Page.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.41.13 PM

We can repeat the process for “Building Relationships and Developing People”, and the other strands of the Leadership Framework.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.42.01 PM

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.42.30 PM

Clicking the “Setting Directions” heading shows us the page.  As we work on our blog, posts that fit this strand can be added to this page.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.42.44 PM

A blog portfolio in progress might look like this:

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.44.08 PM

 

Posts are added to the portfolio pages as they are written:

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.44.50 PM

 

This is the basic Professional Portfolio set up.  How can you personalize your blog and make this your own?

Please feel free to ask questions and share ideas in the comments.

If you have the opportunity to attend the #ontedLeaders Institute, please remember to share your learning with your colleagues who were not able to be at the event in person.

Resources

Dr. Alec Couros – Presentation Resources – Blogging as a Portfolio