Tag Archives: blogging

Day 15: Encouraging our Writers, Nurturing Those Who Share

Today is Day 15.  If you are just starting today, please feel free to work on this session, or to begin on Day 1.

If there is no sharing, there is no learning.

Bloggers take time to share.  They make their learning and thinking open and searchable.  Taking time to read educator blogs helps you to learn from practitioners and to challenge your understanding of best practice.

How do you nurture those who model sharing and connected learning?

Take a moment to thank a blogger, to comment on a connection, to extend their thinking or to share a related story.  Let them know you care.

Today we look at the process of learning to comment on blogs.

This will be our last group session on 30 Days of Connected Leadership for 2015.  We will return to this work in January.

We will now highlight Ontario Education Bloggers on the OSSEMOOC site, and continue the learning on Twitter for Absolute Beginners, and Twitter for Education Leaders.

 

TEN MINUTES OF CONNECTING: DAY 15 – COMMENTING ON BLOGS

 

 

Learning Connection Session Resources

Thanks again to Aviva Dunsiger (@avivaloca) for an informative and inspiring session on leveraging social media for learning, connections and community. Here are the resources from the session:

1. Session Recording

2. Podcast – to be added

3. Slidedeck via slideshare.

4. Class Daily Shoot.

5. A story about literacy centres.

6. 105 The Hive – student led internet radio

7. Bloggers cafe with livescribe.

8. Ideas for parent engagement.

9. Digital Citizenship survival kit

Happy learning!

Your OSAPAC OSSEMOOC Team

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 3 – What Can You Learn Online?

If you came to this page to share, please scroll down to the form at the bottom of the page.
 
(If you are just starting 30 Days of Getthing Connected today, please see the links to Day 1 and Day 2 on the right side of this page.)

 

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Aris.Sanchez via Compfight cc

Finding that 10 minutes to connect might be challenging today, but learning to be a connected leader will help your students in so many ways.

You can do it!

As we continue to look at how we collect information online, we will spend some time today looking at resources for educators.  By the end of the month, you will be curating and sharing these resources with others, but for today, we will just survey some of the valuable resources available to you to help you with your professional learning.

Yesterday we focused on reading some of the blogs written by Ontario educators and other educators.

Take 10 minutes today, and look at some of the valuable information available to you online.

Here are a few sites you might find useful:

Canadian Education Association

TeachThought

ASCD

MindShift

Free Technology for Teachers

Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day

If you already take time to read and learn from websites like these, what other sites would you suggest?  Please fill out the form below, and we will share the responses here for readers.

 

Consider how much easier it will be when you are connected with other educators and you share the best information from sites all over the world!

Responses (it may take awhile for new responses to populate this page).

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 2 – What are other educators thinking?

(If you are just starting today, Day 1 can be found here.)

In our first video yesterday, we watched how learning is all about putting simple concepts together into more complex thinking.

When we consider what it means to be a connected learner, we can break it down into several components:

  • Collecting information
  • Connecting
  • Curating
  • Collaborating and Co-learning
  • Creating and Remixing
  • Sharing

Today we are going to focus on how we can efficiently gather information.  Where can we go to find out what other educators are thinking and doing?  How do we stay current with knowledge about learning?

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Kristina B via Compfight cc

In Ontario, many educators deprivatize their practice and make their thinking and learning visible through blogging.  You can find an extensive list of Ontario “edubloggers” (curated by Doug Peterson) here.  As well, the left side of this page has links to school and system leader blogs in Ontario. The right side of this page has links to a number of Ontario educators who are leading learning  by participating in connected learning through OSSEMOOC.

In your ten minutes of connecting today, take some time to read what other Ontario bloggers have written. How does their thinking align with yours? What new ideas have they shared? What is working/not working for them? What opportunities exist for further connection and collaboration?

We have suggested some Ontario bloggers below.  In our resources section for today, you will find more links to other blogs of interest to educators, suggested collections, and some other thinking about the importance of blogging.

As you browse and read, consider following the blog to get automatic email updates when a new post arrives.  Most blogs have a “follow” button or a place to subscribe.

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If you like the blog, why not check out the blogs that the writer follows?  There is often a link to this information on the website.

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Is reading blogs already part of your daily routine? Please share your favourite blogs in the comments.

 

A Few Ontario Bloggers:

Sue Dunlop (Superintendent, HWDSB)

Brenda Sherry (Vice-Principal, UGDSB)

 

Paul McGuire (Principal, OCSB)

Brandon Grasley (Secondary Math/Computer ScienceTeacher/Lead, ADSB)

Julie Balen (Secondary English Teacher/Leader Wikwemikong Board of Education)

Aviva Dunsiger (Grade 1 Teacher, HWDSB)

Kim Figliomeni (Principal, SNCDSB)

Stacey Wallwin (TELT, SGDSB)

Katie Maenpaa (TELT, SNCDSB)

 

A Few Canadian bloggers:

George Couros (Division Principal, Parkland School Division, Alberta)

Kathy Cassidy (Grade 1 teacher, Author of Connected From The Start: Global Learning for the Primary Grades)

David Truss (Vice Principal of Coquitlam Open Learning & Lead Administrator of the Inquiry Hub at School District 43 (Coquitlam))  Update: Winner of the CEA Ken Spencer Award for Innovation, 2015

Dean Shareski (Community Manager for Discovery Education Canada)

Collaborative Blogging: Canadian Education Association

 

Resources:

Some other blogs of interest to educators:

Jackie Gerstein (USA)

Diane Ravitch (USA)

Langwitches (Sylvia Rosenthal Tolisano, USA)

Tom Whitby (USA)

Pernille Ripp (USA)

 

Further Resources:

Ontario edubloggers

Ontario edubloggers (on CourseHelp.ca)

Isolation is now a choice educators make

Connected Principals

 

 

 

Learning from Ontario Educators

Here in Ontario, we love Fridays!

It’s not just because warm sweaters and jeans are finally acceptable work attire, but also because Doug Peterson is working his best magic in connecting Ontario educators and enabling the sharing we all need to do to keep up with change.

Doug’s #FollowFriday “Active Ontario Educators” posts on Twitter are the perfect starting place for new and old tweeters alike as we build our online PLNs in social media.

But what is really special, is Doug’s curated summary of the Ontario edublogs that impacted his thinking through the week.  What a great opportunity to sample the rich thinking this province has to offer.

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So as we embrace this last Friday of October, and think ahead to our November work in nurturing leaders into becoming “connected”, we want to thank Doug for his tireless efforts to connect our thinking in Ontario, and suggest that following Doug’s work is a great starting point for any Ontario educator looking to become a connected leader.

Happy Hallowe’en!

Digging Into Curation

Contributed by Donna Miller Fry

Here at  #OSSEMOOC we are often asked questions like, “How do you find time to blog?”, or  “How do I find good stuff online?”.

While sharing tools is one approach to answering that question, I like to think of all of these activities as part of the process of curation.

When you have a PLN with strong curation skills, navigating through the vast amount of information online becomes so much easier.  In fact, curation is an important skill for everyone.

Sue Waters (@suewaters) has very neatly and concisely explained the curation process.

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In this post, Sue takes us through the process of discovering and recording information that we need, organizing information, contextualizing, editing and making meaning and then sharing.

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She has also described the process in further detail on her personal blog.

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As you head into summer, consider how the suggestions in this post can help you make your own learning and sharing more effective and efficient.

How can we help our students develop better curation skills?

 

 

30 Days of Learning in Ontario: What Did We Learn Today?

As the 30 Days of Learning in Ontario OSSEMOOC project comes to a close, we want to thank, and congratulate, all of the educators who took the opportunity to share their learning.  For some, it was their very first time posting their thinking in the blog format.  We thank you for taking the time to let others learn from you.  We hope that you will continue to share your learning and connect with others doing the same.

Thank you as well to everyone who took the time to comment on the blog.  You shared your response and your feedback, and kept the thinking and conversations going.

Special thanks to Deb McCallum for creating a flipboard magazine with the content here: https://flipboard.com/section/ossemooc-b4GnnY

One of our goals in OSSEMOOC is to have people connect and then create, to go off and learn and share, to sustain those connections and that learning.  We were excited to see Deborah McCallum’s efforts to collate the 30 Days of Learning in a new format.

 

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Collaborative blogs give ownership to a group rather than an individual.  As co-owners, we all anticipate the next learning.  We are motivated to comment and continue the conversation as we are invested in this community of learners.  Collaborative blogs encourage new thinking, invite new participants, expand our world and our learning.  They give us a focus for reading and sharing.

We learn by watching others.  We teach by modelling the practices we value.  Collaborative blogging allows us to model the action of making thinking visible.

We all have a story to tell, and we learn from each other. Together we are stronger and wiser. Connected learning takes many forms: observing, reading, asking, reflecting, writing, speaking, audio, video and collaborating. Connected learning and leading is a participatory culture. It takes time, time to jump in, time to create new routines and time to build comfort. Courage is needed to put yourself “out there” and find your voice. It is worth the risk to gain insight, broader perspectives and recognize that “the smartest person in the room is the room”.

In our technology enabled learning environments, connected students need connected teachers and leaders. As educators, I believe each of us owns nurturing those around us and role modelling. As pointed out in one of the blog posts, value encouragement and supporting each other with “just right” feedback is important for adult learners too.

Each of the 30 days of learning bloggers has taken the leap of faith, put themselves “out there” to share their reflections and ideas. Congratulations to all for openly participating in the collaborative learning process.

We often wonder why it is so hard to change thinking in education, to bring people into the world of connected learning.  We learned from Tim’s comment that perhaps focusing on the changing world, while validating the work that has been done, is a key component of making this change happen.

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This comment on Stacey Wallwin’s blog helped to reinforce the understanding that what you do has impact that you cannot always see.  Comments like this are the sustenance we all need to keep doing our work to Change the World #CTW

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It’s hard to hit publish.  But opportunity can be fleeting.  Don’t be afraid to share.

Be more dog and grab the frisbee when it comes your way.  Carpe diem!

Mark Carbone and Donna Fry

OSAPAC Co-Leads for #OSSEMOOC.  

Change The World #CTW 

 

30 Days of Learning in Ontario:

The Lead Learners Who Modelled the Importance of Sharing Learning and Thinking

Our model pre-April blogger: Rodd Lucier @thecleversheep

1 Mark Carbone @markwcarbone

2 Cathy Beach @beachcat11

3 Brandon Grasley @bgrasley

4 Aviva Dusinger @avivaloca

5 Heather Theijsmeir @HTheijsmeijer

6 Jonathan So @mrsoclassroom

7 Louise Robitaille @robitaille2011

8 Julie Balen @jacbalen

9 Jac Calder @jaccalder

10 Scott Monahan @monahan_scott

11 Emily Fitzpatrick@ugdsb_missfitz

12 Deborah McCallum @bigideasinedu

13 Paul McGuire @mcguirp

14 Bea Meglio @megliomedia

15 Lindy Henderson @hendylou

16 Andy Forgrave @aforgrave

17 Brandon Grasley @bgrasley

18 Donna Fry @fryed

19 Mrs. Lewis @mrslewistweets

20 Heather Touzin @heathertouzin

21 Mark Carbone @markwcarbone

22 Daniel Pinizzotto @mrpinizzotto

23 Brenda Sherry @brendasherry

24 Michelle Parrish @mproom31

25 Kellyann Power @kellypower

26 Heidi Siwak @heidisiwak

27 Doug Peterson @dougpete

28 Rita Givlin @ritagivlin

29 Stacey Wallwin @wallwins

30 Denise Buttenaar @butden

Day 23:Leaping Ahead With Our Own Learning

Written and shared by Brenda Sherry.

The original post can be found here: http://bsherry.wordpress.com/2014/04/12/otrk12-and-google-summit-learning/

OTRK12 AND GOOGLE SUMMIT LEARNING

My friends Donna Fry and Mark Carbone, co-creators of the #ossemooc  have put out a call for us to share our learning during this month of April and, as always, it takes me a little while to get my posts onto the blog!

Luckily for me, I had two great experiences last week,  one at the #otrk12 conference and one at the #gafesummit in Waterloo.   Starting withStephen Hurley’s examples of passion-based learning at OTRK12 was wonderful and I enjoyed presenting to the e-learning teachers about creating dynamic virtual discussions and seeing Jaclyn Calder’s presentation about the Grader App for D2L with awesome options for providing differentiated and timely feedback to learners.   It’s wonderful to see what an amazing teacher like Jaclyn does with technology!

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While I could share all the tips and tricks that I learned at #otrk12 and the #gafesummit,  I think I’d rather share a few observations that I have mulling around and arising from these 2 great learning events.

A principal from my school board approached me at the Google Summit a little distraught that she had perhaps purchased the wrong technology this year. She has provided her teachers and students with a variety of tools like  ipads, laptops, desktops and Chromebooks.  She seemed a little worried that she had made a wrong choice and should have bought more Chromebooks.  I reminded her, that regardless of how ‘feel good and for the cause of all children and teachers everywhere’ this event undoubtedly was, it was also a Google event after all,  and their mission was to make her feel as though Google products were the bomb. Obviously – they succeeded!

I assured her that an effective technology ecology in her school would also include some higher-end media creation tools like her computers and her ipads, and that she’d want to remember that the ability to do some computing with computers is also a really important skill for our students today.

I remember when Nicholas Negroponte from MIT started to predict that ubiquity would be a game changer in our adoption of technology but that rather than getting simpler, as they should over time,  there was this interesting phenomenon with computers called ‘featuritis’ whereby software developers keep the software getting more complex and complicated (bloated and expensive) rather than cheaper.  Google seems to have figured that out.  Make the browser do most of the work, and the machine could remain inexpensive,  although not as robust.   Maybe robust is not what we are looking for in education anyway.  Easy (for teachers)  seems to be the preferred approach when it comes to technology.   I’m not in complete agreement with this, but I’m learning to accept it.   It is what it is.

People often ask me if I think things are suddenly changing, and while I’m hopeful,  I’m still cautious because I’m not sure it’s the technology that has been holding us back.   We’ve been able to connect our students around the world with blogs since about 2005 and with global projects using forums and list serves since the 1980s.  How many of us jumped on board?  We’ve had extremely rich sites sharing how-to’s of authentic learning and Project Based Learning for more than two decades.   Were we on board then?

We have had Ministry Licensed products that allow multimedia creation and assistive technology for our students for another decade or so.  Were we all making use of these?  When I tell people that my students and I were blogging with other classrooms across the world almost 10 years ago now, and we did this by taking turns all throughout the day on two desktop computers,  they sometimes look at me strangely – like they couldn’t imagine doing that without the Chromebook cart rolled down to the classroom or students 1:1 on their own devices.   They complain that there isn’t enough technology, and yet their classroom computer is often sitting silently in the corner reserved for teacher email.  What’s up with that?

I’m reminded that early adopters will always be willing to put in the countless hours that lead them to mastery of technology tools (and other things) if they feel that will  transform their classrooms – that hasn’t changed much since computers were first introduced into classrooms.

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Despite my observations, and my confusion about slow progress in educational technology, I refuse to become cynical.  Instead, I’m telling myself that it’s the ubiquity and access that will make the difference this time around.  Now that educators can leap ahead with their own learning through connected networks, they are not bound any longer by the limits of their own school building or in-services for learning…they can connect with and  support each other and learn not only how to use these tools, but what effective use looks like.

Now that we can share our success stories and connect more widely through social media and through networks like the #ossemooc there is no reason to ‘wait for the learning’ – we can just go out and get it!  It was exciting to see so many educators at OTRK12 and GAFE Summit finding their community and learning together!

Brenda Sherry is an education leader from UGDSB.

She shares her learning here:

Presentations, workshops and publications
On Twitter @brendasherry
www.diigo.com/user/bsherry
http://delicious.com/bsherry
http://www.slideshare.net/bsherry
www.tech2learn.wikispaces.com

 

Day 9: The Power of Support in Sharing

What I Learned Today: The Power of Support in Sharing #OSSEMOOC

Written and Shared by Jaclyn Calder

Last week Donna Fry challenged us to share. Through this #OSSEMOOC post, she asked us to write a blog post about what we learned today.

The day that Donna sent out this challenge I had spent the day working with a TLLP team in my school around the next steps of our project. The first order of the day was to share what we had learned already. Each teacher wrote a blog post while we were all in the same physical room. For many of us, this was one of our first blog posts. Our goal was to share at least one good thing that had happened in our classroom as part of our journey towards 1:1 BYOD Blended Learning.

Teachers shared posts about the following classroom activities on our TLLP blog http://personalizinglearning.ca/.

What I learned from the process was the power of support in sharing. As we all sat together in the workroom and people learned how to work the blog platform, embed samples of student work and write up their learning in an engaging manner, teachers talked and chatted. Many felt that they didn’t have anything exciting to share, but once we started talking, others in the group jumped on board and started encouraging each other. Pointing out the great practices that were embedded in their classroom activities and how they may adapt the activities to fit other subject area and classes. Teachers even commented on each others blog posts. The atmosphere was amazing, supportive and critical.

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What really resonated with me during the process was the importance of support (moral and technical) to start sharing. We talk about the importance of sharing the good things happening in our classrooms, and becoming connected educators – but how often do we embed the time and support to do the actual sharing as part of our professional development?

This morning of sharing and supporting one another has to be one of my favourite days working with colleagues.

You can find me  and my work online at:

Twitter: @jaccalder www.twitter.com/jaccalder

Skype: jacjaccalder

http://about.me/jaccalder

Photo Credit: Funchye via Compfight cc 

Day 2: Keep It Short!

Make it short….  that’s what I learned today!

When I posted my 4th instalment in my “Gedding It” Series yesterday, I knew it was still way too long.  In this age of the global information trough, I knew no one would get to the end. So why did I sweat over it so much?!?

A few months ago I saw Seth Godin’s blog and thought: that’s what I need. Short quick posts that don’t need a lot of time to read or write.

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Then the same idea popped out at me this morning in Designing What’s Next in Teachers’ Professional Development by @mpelochino (ironically in a long post worth reading to the end).  Short, quick, 2-minute PD!

And then it came up this afternoon again, in a SimpleK12 webinar on the value of making short chunked screencasts — for students and teacher PD!

OK universe. I finally get the message!! (-:

Make it quick, get to the point. Provide links for the people who want depth. Don’t sweat the small stuff (except the links). Imperfect’s better than not done at all.

And that just makes everything a whole lot easier on everyone.

thatwaseasy


Written and shared by Cathy Beach

Recently Retired and Loving I.T.!

Optimistic about the future of education; still busy learning and sharing the connected learning.

 Blog:  Journeys Off the Beaten Path

Twitter and Skype:  @beachcat11

Google Plus:  +Cathy Beach