Tag Archives: collaborate

What Do We Mean By Learning Anyway?

A Connected Educator Month 2015 Event starting on October 1st!

Join Brenda Sherry and Peter Skillen in a collective, month long, discussion to:Cloud Computing Small text

  • extend and deepen our understanding of the term learning
  • participate in a knowledge building approach to collaboration
  • model deep practices for our professional learning environments (colleagues and/or classrooms)

Brief Description (see full site for details)

We will spend the month exploring, unpacking, and discussing what we mean by the term learning. This will include:

  • building background knowledge through sharing and reading resources related to the topic
  • introductory Twitter Chat
  • co-creation of a slidedeck of our ideas
  • reflective Twitter chat
  • contemplative rewriting of our slides
  • culminating creation of reflection statementsVector illustration of two communicating people

We will use a knowledge-building approach to this event.

“If Knowledge building had to be described in a single sentence, it would be: ‘giving students collective responsibility for idea improvement‘.  In Knowledge Building, students work together as a community to build and improve explanations of problems of understanding that arise from the group itself.” (We will be the students in this project!)


So please join us! Go to What Do We Mean By Learning Anyway? for all the details to get started!

Sincerely,

Peter Skillen & Brenda Sherry with the support of OSSEMOOC

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May 21, 2015: Curating Content with Scoop.It

Yesterday we looked at the important digital literacy skill of curation.  Today, we learn to use a popular curation platform (Sccop.It) both as a place to gather curated material in areas you are interested in and as a place for you to share back content that you want to curate.

As a resource, we are using Day 13 from our 30 Days of Getting Connected: Curating with Scoop.It.

 


As a challenge today, set up your own Scoop.It account and share a link you have found valuable this month.  Then, share back on Twitter using the #OSSEMOOC hashtag.

May 6, 2015: What Are Other Educators Thinking?

Let’s learn to find and follow the blogs other educators are writing.

Screencast:

Resources:

Ten Minutes of Connecting Day 2 (here)

Events: 

7 p.m. EDT: #onedchat Achieving Excellence!  Follow the hashtag on Twitter, and participate if you already have an account.

Challenge:  

Find two blogs that are interesting to you.  Use suggestions you find in the Ten Minutes of Connecting Day 2 Resource, or choose blogs from the margins of this page, or from the Ontario Educators site.

Follow the blogs by email.  Next week, we will ask what you have learned from these blogs so far, so get ready to share!

Later this week we will ask other educators to share their favourite blogs with our newly connected leaders.

Tuesday, May 5, 2015: Websites for Educators

In Week 1, we are looking at all the ways we can collect the information we need for our personal professional learning.

What are some of the great resources out there for educators?

Screencast:

Slides for this screencast are available here.

Resources:

Ten Minutes of Connecting Day 3 (here)

Events: Ontario Game Changer Series:

Ruben Puentedura, 7 p.m. – The SAMR Model

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CgyNKsnuBB4

Challenge:

Let’s build a collaborative document that lists the best websites for educators.  Take a moment to fill in this form.

Be sure to share the link with others.  Fill out the form as many times as you like.  Ask your colleagues about their favourite websites and share them here.

The results will be shared in a Google Sheet here.

Please Share: How Do School and System Leaders Use Google Apps in Their Practice?

We are collecting the different ways School and System Leaders use Google Apps in their practice.  

The OSSEMOOC team will be sharing this at the GAFE Summit in Kitchener, and then we will share back with Ontario Educators.  

Please take a moment to share how Google Apps are used in your practice.

If nobody shares, nobody learns!

 

Leadership in a Networked World

How is Education Leadership in our Networked World different from leadership in the past?

Over the next few weeks, we are considering the skills needed for leaders in a rapidly changing world.

We consider this recent article: Are you a Digital or Analog Leader?

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From Bill Fisher in Forbes: Are you an Analog or a Digital Leader?

 

As you look at the article, consider the chart that compares analog and digital leaders.  While this article is for business leaders, we see many words that are bubbling up in education conversations today: “fail”, “ideas”, “multi-disciplinary”, “ecosystem”, “innovation”…

 

We also consider the ISTE Standards for Administrators.

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 7.22.13 AM
… from ISTE Standards for Administrators: http://www.iste.org/docs/pdfs/20-14_ISTE_Standards-A_PDF.pdf

 

What leadership skills and competencies do you think are required in today’s networked world?

 

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 23 – Yes, It’s Time to Start Your Own Blog!

Much of the work we have done so far in getting connected has been about where to find information on the web, and how to share the valuable information with others.

Shared by Dafyd Jones under a Creative Commons Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share-Alike License.
Shared by Dafyd Jones under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-Commercial – Share-Alike License.

But what if nobody created any of the resources you are sharing?

Your presence online is valuable because others are creating and sharing with you.  You are a valuable part of your own PLN.  Creating and sharing back with your colleagues is an important part of the process, and a valuable aspect of your own professional learning.

Today we start supporting you in the process of creating your own blog.

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share-Alike License by Dekuwa.
Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-Commercial – Share-Alike License by Dekuwa.

You can’t create a blog in ten minutes, so we have broken the process down into a series of easy steps.  Our goal is to have your blog live online before the end of this 30-day series.

Are you ready?

First, what do we mean by the word “blog”? We need to have a shared understanding of what a blog is.

Edublogs, one of many possible platforms for your blog, has created this instructional video that will give you the basics of what a blog is in under four minutes!

The next step in setting up your own blog is making a decision about what platform you will use to host your blog.  Many educators use one platform for student blogs and a different platform for their personal blog.  How should you decide?

Edublogs recently did a survey of bloggers, asking about their platform of choice.  Reading their comments might help you with your decision.

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Of course, asking your PLN on Twitter what platform they use and why is an awesome use of your Professional Learning Network to support you in your work.

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If your friends are already blogging, ask them what they use and why.

Once you have made your decision, it’s easy to sign up for a free blog.

(OSSEMOOC is currently using a WordPress.com site, and as we work through the components of blogs this week, we will be using examples from our own WordPress.com site.  If you are really new to Web 2.0 tools, you may want to start with a WordPress.com blog and follow our tutorials.  Once you understand the fundamentals, you can switch to any hosting site of your choice.)

Screen Shot 2014-11-23 at 8.34.17 AM

Screen Shot 2014-11-23 at 8.34.00 AM

Screen Shot 2014-11-23 at 8.32.53 AM

If you are already a blogger, what tips can you offer new bloggers?

Resources:

Personal Blogging – a fantastic step-by-step guide by Edublog’s Sue Waters.

 

 

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 20 – How Leaders Use Google Drive for Collaboration

Today we are building on some of the learning you have been doing in this series.  We have focused on a number of tools to help you connect.  We hope that you are continuing to set aside 10 minutes each day to connect through one of those tools, or to learn something new with us.

This series will continue to exist on our website even after November 30.  You can work through it at a pace that suits you.  If you find it helpful, please spread it to your colleagues.  Use the link at the top of this page to suggest other topics you need to learn about, or simply post a comment on the blog asking for help.  The whole purpose of OSSEMOOC is to support education leaders (formal and informal) in getting connected and modelling the learning we want to see in our “classrooms”.

Connecting drives innovative thinking!

Yesterday we looked at how to access and build your Google Drive so that you can share your documents, images, spreadsheets, presentations and resources with others.  Google Drive allows you to easily collaborate on any topic with those on your team.

How are school and system leaders around the world leveraging this method of collaboration?

Photo shared by in_case under a Creative Commons attribution license.
Photo shared by in_case under a Creative Commons attribution license.

Take ten minutes today to explore some of the possibilities that will help you to transform the way you do your work and model the learning for those in your sphere of influence.

If you are already using Google Drive in your practice, please share how by posting this on your blog and sharing the link on Twitter under the #ossemooc hashtag.  Or, please share how you use Google Drive in the comments for this post.

Let other leaders see the power of collaborating online!

Resources:

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Google Docs for Administrators: 5 Ideas to Get Started – by Kyle Pace.  How can we streamline administrative tasks with Google Docs? “Administrators modelling for teachers, which will hopefully lead to teachers modelling for students.”

Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 10.30.02 AMGoogle Docs for Administrators: 5 More Ideas – by Kyle Pace.   More ideas for streamlining the tasks of school leaders, including event planning and teacher collaboration.

Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 11.06.33 AMWeb 2.0ing Your Staff Meetings – by Mark W. Carbone. Great ideas for bringing staff meetings to life and incorporating asynchronous collaboration.

 

 

 Google Apps for School Administrators – Derrick Waddell

Shared under a Creative Commons attribution - non-comercial - no derivs license by Don Shall
Shared under a Creative Commons attribution – non-commercial – no derivatives license by Don Shall

 

Further Resources:  

Google Tutorials (Richard Byrne)

 

 

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 19 – Collaborating with Google Docs

Today’s 10 minutes of connecting is a beginner’s look at collaboration with Google Docs.

There are very few places that don’t use Google Drive today to collaborate on notes, projects, presentations, thinking, etc.

Google Drive allows you to create different types of shared files, like spreadsheets and presentations. Google Docs is a starting place for getting used to using cloud storage and sharing documents with others.

We have embedded two instructional videos that begin at the very beginning – creating your own Google Drive.  It’s a bit longer than 10 minutes, but we suggest that you watch them as far as you need to, and then go to your own Google Drive and practice.

For those already using Google Drive, this would be a great time to nurture others in learning to collaborate online using this tool.

If you are a Google expert, what resources would you suggest for those just beginning to use collaborative documents?

If you need more help with Google Docs or Google Drive, please feel free to tell us in the comments, or on Twitter @OSSEMOOC

 


Resources:

Google Drive Help Centre

Collaborative Note-Taking with Google Docs by Shake Up Learning

Google Drive Resources by Shake Up Learning

Going Google with Google Drive

Sample Shared Google Docs:

Digital Storytelling Resources (Alec Couros)

Twitter Chat Times (a “Google Sheet”)