Tag Archives: create

Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship: David Sornberger Leads a Discussion on ICE in SHSM

Join us [here]  to discuss ICE (Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship) in the Specialist High Skills Major program in Ontario.  David Sornberger,  District Principal of School Improvement with Trillium Lakelands District School Board,  shares the work his board is doing with this program.  We encourage you to join in, learn, and share in this conversation.

This discussion is also available on live internet radio and through podcast after the event.  We post recordings on this site as well.

We look forward to this conversation Tuesday, April 7, 2015 at 8 p.m. EDT.

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David Jaremy: How Do We Interact With The Digital World?

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What are you thinking about these days?  As we wind down 2014, we are following Tom Carroll’s lead and asking this question of our education leaders in Ontario.

OSSEMOOC has included links to educator blogs on this website so that they are easily accessible.

Today we are reading David Jaremy’s blog, where he writes about his first impressions of the book “The Digital Principal” by Janette Hughes and Anne Burke.

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David writes about his thinking around the read-write web and how our ability (and, perhaps, our obligation) to contribute, changes the way we need to interact with our students.

How many of us have taken the time to think about this?

Where do we share our ideas around this shift?

His post reminded me of an example we used in our “30 Days of Getting Connected” Series.  Ira David Socol writes about how change is not new, but in the Web 1.0 days, change was happening at a different level, and was not as apparent to us.  Web 2.0, the read-write web, allows the ability to create and contribute, which results in change that impacts all of us.

For an excellent overview of Web 1.0 -> Web 2.0 -> Web 3.0 and its impact on learning and teaching, refer to the work of Dr. Jackie Gerstein here.

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution - Non-Commercial - No Derivatives licence by Dr. Jackie Gerstien.
Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-Commercial – No Derivatives licence by Dr. Jackie Gerstein.

So how does the read-write web change our dynamics as a teacher?

We look forward to reading more of David Jaremy’s thinking and reading on this topic.  In the meantime, continue the conversation by leaving comments on his blog post here.

*David Jaremy is the Principal of Hornepayne Elementary and Secondary School, a JK-12 school in a small, Northern Ontario community!

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 23 – Yes, It’s Time to Start Your Own Blog!

Much of the work we have done so far in getting connected has been about where to find information on the web, and how to share the valuable information with others.

Shared by Dafyd Jones under a Creative Commons Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share-Alike License.
Shared by Dafyd Jones under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-Commercial – Share-Alike License.

But what if nobody created any of the resources you are sharing?

Your presence online is valuable because others are creating and sharing with you.  You are a valuable part of your own PLN.  Creating and sharing back with your colleagues is an important part of the process, and a valuable aspect of your own professional learning.

Today we start supporting you in the process of creating your own blog.

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share-Alike License by Dekuwa.
Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-Commercial – Share-Alike License by Dekuwa.

You can’t create a blog in ten minutes, so we have broken the process down into a series of easy steps.  Our goal is to have your blog live online before the end of this 30-day series.

Are you ready?

First, what do we mean by the word “blog”? We need to have a shared understanding of what a blog is.

Edublogs, one of many possible platforms for your blog, has created this instructional video that will give you the basics of what a blog is in under four minutes!

The next step in setting up your own blog is making a decision about what platform you will use to host your blog.  Many educators use one platform for student blogs and a different platform for their personal blog.  How should you decide?

Edublogs recently did a survey of bloggers, asking about their platform of choice.  Reading their comments might help you with your decision.

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Of course, asking your PLN on Twitter what platform they use and why is an awesome use of your Professional Learning Network to support you in your work.

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If your friends are already blogging, ask them what they use and why.

Once you have made your decision, it’s easy to sign up for a free blog.

(OSSEMOOC is currently using a WordPress.com site, and as we work through the components of blogs this week, we will be using examples from our own WordPress.com site.  If you are really new to Web 2.0 tools, you may want to start with a WordPress.com blog and follow our tutorials.  Once you understand the fundamentals, you can switch to any hosting site of your choice.)

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If you are already a blogger, what tips can you offer new bloggers?

Resources:

Personal Blogging – a fantastic step-by-step guide by Edublog’s Sue Waters.

 

 

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 22 – Making Thinking Visible Through Blogging

As we move into the last week of our “10 minutes of Connecting” series, we continue on from our thinking about Collecting – Connecting – Curating – Collaborating to Creating and Sharing.

One of the easiest ways to own your own creative digital space is to start your own blog.

Shared under a Creative Commons attribution - non-commercial - Share-alike license by Konrad Glogowski
Shared under a Creative Commons attribution – non-commercial – Share-alike license by Konrad Glogowski

You have already started your “blogging” work by contributing to the “microblog” Twitter.  When 140 characters isn’t enough, you need to create your own space to share your thinking and learning.

There are many reasons to start your own blog.  Today we are considering the purpose of blogs, and how they can help us in our own learning.

Many leaders start blogs as a way to help publicize and share the great work being done at their school.

Others make their personal growth plan visible to their school community.

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution License by Christian Schnettelker
Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution License by Christian Schnettelker

A blog can be a place to share resources and learning plans for a group of learners.

Some leaders use their blog as a professional portfolio, demonstrating the work they do in each area of the leadership framework.

Take some time today to look at the blogs posted in the margins of this page.  This time, look for the purpose of the blog.

How can blogging help you in your work as a lead learner?

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution - Non-commercial - Share-alike license by Giulia Forsythe
Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-commercial – Share-alike license by Giulia Forsythe

Resources:

Blogging Resources for Teachers: Sue Waters

Blogging With Your Students: Langwitches Blog

Why Teachers Should Have Blogs: George Couros

The Need for Courageous Leadership: George Couros

Documenting for Learning:  Langwitches Blog

Visible Thinking Routines for Bloggers: Langwitches Blog

How to Grow a Blog – Konrad Glogowski

 

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 17 – Photo Sharing with Flickr

The internet makes it so easy for us to share and access beautiful images.  Today we explore the use of those shared images, and one way we can use social media to share our photographs.

The site that we are exploring today is Flickr.  It is just one of many image sharing sites.

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If you have a Yahoo account, you can create a Flickr account using it.  If you are new to Yahoo, you will need to begin by creating an account.

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Once you have an account, “get started”!

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You can create different Flickr accounts for different purposes.  There are many ways to use Flickr in the classroom.  For today, we will use our ten minutes to explore Creative Commons images, and sharing images.

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When you first see your Flickr page, there will be some images and users suggested for you to follow.  It isn’t necessary to follow other Flickr users, but you can if you like to create a photo feed.

 

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Along the right side of the page are some Flickr projects you can explore, such as “The Commons”.

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“The Commons” is different from “Creative Commons”.  Creative Commons is a system of licensing use of original material.  Our “go to” expert on Creative Commons in Ontario is Rodd Lucier, and this blog post is a “must read” for educators in this province: Creative Commons: What Every Educator Needs to Know.

Shared under a Creative Commons non-commercial share-alike license by Kristina Alexanderson (click the image to see the source).
Shared under a Creative Commons non-commercial share-alike license by Kristina Alexanderson (click the image to see the source).

If you search “creative commons” on Flickr, you are directed to this site.  When Flickr users share their work under a Creative Commons license, you can reuse the images according to the user specifications (i.e., the type of license chosen for the work).

 

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Choose the type of license that meets your needs, and “see more”.

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You will be provided with an option to search.  We have entered “Lake Superior” to see what Flickr users have contributed on this topic.

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We get a large number of stunning images from our search.

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Images shared under a Creative Commons attribution license by Adam Kahtava, Natalie Lucier and Kevin Dooley.

 

 

We love the NASA image of fall colours around the lake.  Clicking on the image takes us to the Flickr page where this image is posted.

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We notice that there are limitations in using this image.

 

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Clicking on “Some rights reserved” takes us to the Creative Commons License that explains how we can use the image in our own work.

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We are able to use the image, as long as we give proper credit to the source.  The source of the image is provided.

 

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If I used the image in a blog, I would create a link to the image that takes the reader to the original image site if they click on the image.  I would also provide attribution information in the caption, or on the blog page.  Similarly, using the image in a presentation would require appropriate attribution on the slide, including a link to the original site/license.

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution License by NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team
Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution License by NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

 

 

 

Keep in mind that our search was only for work that had an attribution license.  There are many other licenses we can search.

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We could return to the original Creative Commons search page, or we could adjust the parameters at the top of the page that help us to filter our search more precisely.

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By searching again, we get a different set of results.

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Image shared under a Creative Commons attribution, non-commercial license by fryed_2010.

By investigating this photo, we learned that it had an attribution non-commercial license, and that our use of this image was limited to non-commercial applications.

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Flickr is also a place where you can share your own photos with friends, or even contribute to the collection of images available to others for learning and creating by licensing your work appropriately.

Choose “upload” on the top navigation bar.

 

 

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Choose the photo you will share, then follow the instructions to edit the title and description.  Click on “owner settings” to choose the license for your image.Screen Shot 2014-11-17 at 10.47.17 AM

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Add a number of tags to your photo so that it will appear as a result when others are searching.

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Check to see that the information is correct, and choose upload.Screen Shot 2014-11-17 at 10.49.43 AM

Your image now appears on your site.Screen Shot 2014-11-17 at 10.50.11 AM

You can be more social on Flickr, and follow the images that your friends are uploading.

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Continue to explore this site in your spare time.  OSSEMOOC will continue to share other classroom uses for Flickr.

 

Resources:

Creative Commons: What Every Educator Needs to Know (by Rodd Lucier)

Searching for Creative Commons Images on Flickr

Using Flickr in the Classroom: TeachThought.com

Compfight: Finding images with the licenses you need

Digital Storytelling: Five Card Flickr (with @cogdog)