Tag Archives: digital storytelling

May 12: Connecting Through Online Learning

Today we look at how we can connect with other educators by taking advantage of online learning opportunities.

If you are a connected educator and leader, you will often hear of opportunities to learn online through, for example, MOOCs, webinars, internet radio, and Hangouts on Air.  Taking part in these learning events allows us to connect through the chat or by taking a leading role, and often these connections lead to ongoing conversations, blog posts, and other forms of sharing.

Tonight, OSSEMOOC is offering and opportunity to learn about digital storytelling with two of the best in the “business”!

Join us here at 8 p.m. EDT for a fun look at digital storytelling.  Our group task, and your challenge for today, is outlined here.  Bring your phone or tablet, or do the task in advance, but be sure to participate!

More details here.

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Join us at 8 p.m. EDT on May 12 for this session.

Digital Storytelling

On Tuesday May 12th,  we are pleased to welcome Alan Levine (@cogdog) and Darren Kuropatwa  (@dkuropatwa)  share their collaborative work around connecting and the power of digital storytelling.

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@dkuropatwa is the Curriculum Coordinator at St. James-Assiniboia School Division in Manitoba

 

 

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Alan Levine explains himself here: http://cogdog.info/ We know him affectionately as @cogdog

 

This session will begin at 8:00 p.m. EDT.  Join the online presentation and collaboration space anytime after 7:30 by clicking [here].

This is not just a sit and get! Bring your phone or tablet or camera and participate!

Alternatively, feel free to listen in via our internet radio broadcast.

We look forward to your participation in this session.  Here’s a sneak peak at what is planned.

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Click the image for the full digital story!

 

Your OSAPAC OSSEMOOC Team.

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 29 – Digital Leadership

Congratulations! You have now spent 28 days learning how to be a connected leader.

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share-Alike License by Guilia Forsythe
Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-Commercial – Share-Alike License by Guilia Forsythe

Throughout this series we have emphasized the critical importance of Digital Leadership.  Today we want to share some further thinking around this topic.  In particular, consider the changing conversations around the concept of Digital Citizenship.

Here are a few opportunities to expand your thinking about the importance of being a networked lead learner.

In 2008,  Ira Socol shared his thinking about why so few educators were connected leaders.  Take a few minutes to read this excerpt, or click on the image to read the full essay.

 

From "Toolbelt Theory for Everyone" by Ira David Socol, 2008 (click on the image for the link to the blog)
From “Toolbelt Theory for Everyone” by Ira David Socol, 2008 (click on the image for the link to the blog)

 

Today, we often hear that it isn’t about the tools, it’s about the pedagogy.  What does your experience tell you about this?  Should we be teaching tool use explicitly in schools?  How does this posting challenge your thinking about your leadership?

As leaders in education, we often think about the safety of children in online spaces.  How do we best teach digital citizenship in our schools?  Current thinking about this topic is shifting, as evidenced by the following conversation with Tanya Avrith.

(Tanya’s script from her ISTE Ignite session can be found here: http://www.edtechschools.com/rebrand-digital-citizenship-get-ignited/)

Screen Shot 2014-12-01 at 6.48.39 AMGeorge Couros frequently speaks about the importance of establishing our own digital presence, before someone does it for us.

Every one of your students will be Googled before they get their first job.  How are you helping them to create the digital presence that will help them achieve success? (@jcasap)

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Eric Sheninger has written extensively on the importance of Digital Leadership, and how it is the most important factor in creating schools that work for kids.

Dean Shareski shares his thoughts here on how technology can be a catalyst for changing educator mindsets.

What do you think?  Take some time to reflect on your learning over the past month.  How does the concept of “digital leadership” fit with your current professional practice?

What further resources do you have to help others with their learning on this topic?

 

Further Resources:

How to Become a Digital Leader: Bill Ferriter (@plugusin) on ASCD

7 Pillars of Digital Leadership: Eric Sheniger on TeachThought

Leadership Resources: Stacey Wallwin (@wallwins)

Why do [Our Students] Need Connected Leaders?

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 28 – Digital Storytelling for Beginners

Why is Storytelling Important?

If the idea that storytelling is important is a new one for you, we suggest that you take your 10 minutes today, and explore some of the resources below.

The importance of storytelling has been documented on many levels.  Some of us came through a school system that de-emphasized the importance of stories, and valued the  memorization of facts.  We may need to relearn the power of stories, and how they can play a critical role in our work as educators.

Consider the breadth of the idea of storytelling on Wikipedia.

Explore the importance of storytelling in First Nations Pedagogy.

 

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share-Alike license by Guilia Forsythe.
Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-Commercial – Share-Alike license by Guilia Forsythe.

“When it comes to inspiring people to embrace some strange new change in behaviour, storytelling isn’t just better than the other tools. It’s the only thing that works.”

Steve Denning

Still not convinced?

Check out some of these TED Talks on the topic of storytelling, or this article in The Guardian on the Importance of Storytelling in the Digital Age.

 

Why Is It Important to Tell Our Stories?

Taken from a post by Stephen Hurley. Click the image for the link to the post.
Taken from a post by Stephen Hurley. Click the image for the link to the post.

If we don’t tell our stories, someone else will.  We are doing amazing work in education today. Who are we telling about it?

The importance of taking time to tell our stories is captured in this post by Stephen Hurley:  Telling Tales Out of School: The Stories that Emerge from the Work That We Do.  We hope you will take a few minutes to read it and consider your role in spreading the great stories of public education in Ontario.

Taken from a post by @stephen_hurley. Click the image for the link to the original post.
Taken from a post by @stephen_hurley. Click the image for the link to the original post.

 

Earlier this year, Darren Kuropatwa visited OSSEMOOC to share ideas around Digital Storytelling.  You can access his slides here.

Some of our participants shared their learning in the video below.

 

How can we begin to use digital storytelling in our classrooms?

This example from Kathy Cassidy demonstrates the power of tools available to help even early primary students share their stories.

 

From Kathy Cassidy's post on "Blogging in a Primary Classroom with only One iPad" (click on the image for the link)
From Kathy Cassidy’s post on “Blogging in a Primary Classroom with only One iPad” (click on the image for the link)

 

How can you find out more about Digital Storytelling?  Here is a great starting point: 50+ Web Ways to Tell a Story (by Alan Levine – @cogdog)

What digital storytelling resources or examples do you have to share?

Further Resources:

Digital Storytelling Tools

Digital Storytelling Resources (Dr. Alec Couros – @courosa) -> further resources here as well

Storytelling (David Jakes – @djakes)

Kathy Schrock's Guide to Digital Storytelling (click on the image for the link to the guide)
Kathy Schrock’s Guide to Digital Storytelling (click on the image for the link to the guide)

Playing with Metaphors: The Ripple

On Tuesday evening, OSSEMOOC was so fortunate to have Stephen Hurley join us for a conversation around the ideas of continuity and change in our school systems.

Stephen introduced the idea of a drop of water as a metaphor for change: http://www.stephenhurley.ca/the-metaphor-project/

It’s the ripples I am thinking about today.

At Connect 2014, Dean Shareski invited particpants to consider two questions:

1) What did you learn today? and 2) How did you contribute to the learning of others?

Darren Kuropatwa facilitated the creation of a video of people in the audience sharing  their responses.

The next weekend, at edCampIsland, participants were so intrigued by the video that they wanted to share their learning in the same way.

 

 

(You will notice that the first learning comes from the GAFE Summit in Kitchener (Be More Dog) and @shareski from SeLNO2013 (JOY!))

At the same event (Connect 2014), Darren Kuropatwa challenged us to become digital storytellers like this:

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This week at OSSEMOOC, he asked us to do the same thing, but from the online, rather than f2f,  environment.  Even though we were scattered across the country, we were rockstars at this!

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Today at our Ontario Provincial Digital Learning Meeting, I shared Darren’s work with the group, but I was also sad to have to say goodbye to one of our eLearning Contacts who is returning to the classroom next year.

I just bet he will take his mad skills in digital storytelling with him.

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How will your work today continue to ripple through the lives of others and make a difference for our learners?

This post was shared by  Donna Miller Fry.