Tag Archives: leader

January 27, 2015: Thinking About Professional Learning

The OSSEMOOC Tuesday Night Open Mic session (January 27, 8 p.m. EST) will focus on some of the key conversations from Educon on the topic of Professional Learning.

Click  [here]  to join the meeting room anytime after 7:30.

If you check the #hackpd hashtag and the #Educon hashtag, you will see some of the rich conversations that happened this past weekend at the Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia.  We want to bring your thoughts on this topic into the conversation.

Here is our key question (originally posed by David Jakes and Kristin Swanson at Educon 2.7):

 “How does a shift occur from a mindset where learning is provided to a culture where learning is sought?”

 

To dig into this, we will focus mainly on the role of the educator.

 

Here are a few of the questions we are posing for this week:

 

1. What do well-designed learning experiences for adults look like?

 

2. Do you believe that all educator professional learning should be directed by what knowledge and skills the data indicate that students need to succeed (i.e., that all professional learning is based on student learning needs)?

 

3.  Should school and system leadership support teachers in the design of their own learning experiences?  If so, how can they do this?

4. Should schools create a culture of teacher-learner agency? (From Wikipedia, “In the social sciencesagency is the capacity of individuals to act independently and to make their own free choices”.)

5. Do you think that “Professional Development” creates a culture of learned helplessness?

 

6. A conversation around this provocation:

 

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We hope you will join in the synchronous conversation, and continue to add your thinking to the #hackpd , #ossemooc , and #ontedleaders conversations online. Resources:
1. Solving the Professional Learning Crisis
2. What Counts as Professional Learning?
3. Effective Professional Learning

 

Ten Minutes of Connecting: Day 29 – Digital Leadership

Congratulations! You have now spent 28 days learning how to be a connected leader.

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share-Alike License by Guilia Forsythe
Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-Commercial – Share-Alike License by Guilia Forsythe

Throughout this series we have emphasized the critical importance of Digital Leadership.  Today we want to share some further thinking around this topic.  In particular, consider the changing conversations around the concept of Digital Citizenship.

Here are a few opportunities to expand your thinking about the importance of being a networked lead learner.

In 2008,  Ira Socol shared his thinking about why so few educators were connected leaders.  Take a few minutes to read this excerpt, or click on the image to read the full essay.

 

From "Toolbelt Theory for Everyone" by Ira David Socol, 2008 (click on the image for the link to the blog)
From “Toolbelt Theory for Everyone” by Ira David Socol, 2008 (click on the image for the link to the blog)

 

Today, we often hear that it isn’t about the tools, it’s about the pedagogy.  What does your experience tell you about this?  Should we be teaching tool use explicitly in schools?  How does this posting challenge your thinking about your leadership?

As leaders in education, we often think about the safety of children in online spaces.  How do we best teach digital citizenship in our schools?  Current thinking about this topic is shifting, as evidenced by the following conversation with Tanya Avrith.

(Tanya’s script from her ISTE Ignite session can be found here: http://www.edtechschools.com/rebrand-digital-citizenship-get-ignited/)

Screen Shot 2014-12-01 at 6.48.39 AMGeorge Couros frequently speaks about the importance of establishing our own digital presence, before someone does it for us.

Every one of your students will be Googled before they get their first job.  How are you helping them to create the digital presence that will help them achieve success? (@jcasap)

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Eric Sheninger has written extensively on the importance of Digital Leadership, and how it is the most important factor in creating schools that work for kids.

Dean Shareski shares his thoughts here on how technology can be a catalyst for changing educator mindsets.

What do you think?  Take some time to reflect on your learning over the past month.  How does the concept of “digital leadership” fit with your current professional practice?

What further resources do you have to help others with their learning on this topic?

 

Further Resources:

How to Become a Digital Leader: Bill Ferriter (@plugusin) on ASCD

7 Pillars of Digital Leadership: Eric Sheniger on TeachThought

Leadership Resources: Stacey Wallwin (@wallwins)

Why do [Our Students] Need Connected Leaders?

Connected Learners Need Connected Leaders: Ontario Leaders in the Spotlight @k12Online Conference!

Thanks to our Ontario Education Leaders who so generously shared their journey to getting connected for the K12 Online Conference this morning.

Join OSSEMOOC, and work through each day in November to become a connected leader in 2014!  Our “10 minutes to getting connected” tutorials begin November 1.  Don’t wait!

“T-Shaped” People

This post by  David Culberhouse  (Educator, Senior Director Elementary Ed, Previous Principal CA Distinguished School, Co-Moderator West Coast #satchat) is the fourth in a series called  “The Creative Leader”.

Here he explores the notion of ‘T-shaped’ people. His message is clear: leaders need to understand what creativity and innovation look like, and they need to intentionally build a staff with people who have depth of knowledge in one area and who can also branch out and work creatively and collaboratively in another.

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Shared by: David Theriault, English Teacher in southern California (@davidtedu)

The work of leadership is not just to ensure that educators have deep knowledge of their disciplines, but that they have the flexibility to move laterally across the building, across disciplines, across grades to be innovative and creative.

I love this post because I do think that we need to figure out how to become more interdisciplinary in high schools. We need to not just have ‘open doors’, but flattened walls. We need people who can think and create and innovate and initiate from their deep curricular and disciplinary knowledge and who can also take that thinking, creating, innovating beyond their curriculum and discipline to uncharted waters.

Bring on the Ts!!

Shared by: Julie Balen, High School English Teacher, Wikwemikong Board of Education (@jacbalen)

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