Tag Archives: social media

Connected Leadership for the 2015-2016 School Year

As you think about your role as a leader during the 2015-2016 school year, you know that being connected is an important part of your work.  A simple first step to connecting with other leaders around the province and around the world is learning to leverage social media for professional learning.

Educators learn and share together on Twitter.

Update: CBC’s interview on why principals and teacher must be on social media

OSSEMOOC is an open support system for leaders to learn to connect and self-direct their professional learning.  A perfect starting point is to get connected on Twitter.

If you are uneasy about getting on social media, here are some steps you can take to access professional learning anonymously.  This is a great starting point for beginners.

On May 5, 2015, we shared how you can use Twitter as a public library.  Read the full post and access all the resources here or start with just the short screencast below.


Once you are ready to be a participant on Twitter, this resource will help you get started.

This short screencast shows you what you will learn.


Check the OSSEMOOC site daily for more support in becoming a connected leader in 2015-2106.

Learning Connections

On June 2,   Aviva Dunsiger  (@avivaloca)  joins us at  8:00 EDT  to share her journey in engaging students and parents through social media to maximize her classroom learning community opportunities  and deepen the experiences.

Join the online presentation and collaboration space any time after 7:30 p.m. EDT by clicking [here].

Alternatively, you may join the internet radio broadcast.

We look forward to your participation.

Your OSAPAC OSSEMOOC Team

 

May 21, 2015: Curating Content with Scoop.It

Yesterday we looked at the important digital literacy skill of curation.  Today, we learn to use a popular curation platform (Sccop.It) both as a place to gather curated material in areas you are interested in and as a place for you to share back content that you want to curate.

As a resource, we are using Day 13 from our 30 Days of Getting Connected: Curating with Scoop.It.

 


As a challenge today, set up your own Scoop.It account and share a link you have found valuable this month.  Then, share back on Twitter using the #OSSEMOOC hashtag.

Where is the Next Network?

 

Where is the next network? Google Educator Groups

posted in Digital Transformation by Paul McGuire

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Google (Photo credit: warrantedarrest)

I am always looking for opportunities to push myself to learn more.  I find that becoming an active member of networks is a great way to do this.  At the very least, it gets me to write and post more material.  The OSSEMOOC is a great example of a network that has motivated me to post.  It’s a little like the ‘publish or perish‘ notion.  If your blog is publicized on other sites, but better keep writing!

Yesterday, I heard about another network that looks like it has potential – Google Educator Groups #GEG.

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I took a look at where you can find GEGs and there are none in Canada!  We need to do something about that.

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The idea behind the GEGs sounds really interesting.  From their site, GEG leaders benefit in the following ways:

  • Meeting like minded people, breaking the walls of isolation
  • Becoming well connected to people of similar passion
  • Building learning management, event management, communication and organization skills as you hold events.
  • Eligible to attend local GEG Leader summits hosted by Google

This is what is wonderful about social media and education, there are so many great networks that you can join that connects you to other educators.  In the past year I have connected to ECOO (the BIT 2014 Conference), OSSEMOOC, DLMOOC (need to get back to that!), #SAVMP mentorship group via @gcouros, a terrific Edmodo book chat on Digital Leadership through #satchat, Learning Connections – Google + group run through #OCSB as well as a whole host of Twitter chats and Google + discussions.

Every day I learn through these great networks.  At this point, I can’t imagine being an educator and not being connected, my networks are my own personal school.  There are so many great initiatives and ideas out there that I would be totally in the dark without my learning partners.

Even worse, without my personal learning network I would be dependant on professional development delivered in the tradition method through our own district.  This way of learning simply does not work anymore.  We can complain about this or we can do something much more useful – make up your own learning network – get connected – today!

So next, time to get some GEGs into Canada – any volunteers?

Shared by Paul McGuire @mcguirp

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Pinterest isn’t just for crafts! Leading learning happens there too!

I have followed Eric Sheninger on Twitter for years, and I have learned so much from him.  His work in digital leadership is outstanding.  Yesterday I learned that he also shares on Pinterest!

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This is an awesome Pinterest board to follow if you are new to building a PLN on Twitter.

This “picture and post” is shared by Donna Miller Fry.

Day 14: Words That Resonate – Inspiration from Google Summit 2014

Created and shared by Bea Meglio

Bea’s Piktochart can be viewed here: https://magic.piktochart.com/output/1671747-words-that-resonate

Screen shots of the graphic can be viewed below.

Please take the time to comment. Do you agree? Start the conversation!

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Bea Meglio, with over 25 years of classroom experience, is a passionate advocate for empowering teachers and students to always strive to reach their potential. Currently as an Education Officer with e-Learning Ontario, she works towards supporting digital opportunities for all learners.

Follow Bea on Twitter: @megliomedia

Day 12: Supporting Educators and Promoting New and Improved Learning for Our Students

Written and shared by Deborah McCallum

I have been doing a lot of thinking lately about what learning is going to look like for our students in the future, and how education needs to change, to meet the needs of society. There are great leaders and movements starting up in Ontario that are helping to support educators and promote new and improved learning for our students.

Indeed, I believe that these new movements need to include embracing eLearning and blended learning environments as frameworks and catalysts for facilitating and activating successful learning for our students.

Today’s education system is outdated in many ways. Structures and institutions are built upon values from the Industrial era. Our students are no longer growing up in this era. There are new opportunities to learn, and learning can look different in different communities and families, cultures. Society has changed in many ways. As Steven Hurley stated in his opening speech at the On The Rise Conference (OTRK12) – desks may be organized in groups, but alas, they are still the same desks!

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We have new technologies that have permeated the rest of our world, our economies are changing rapidly, and job security and stability will not mean the same things for our children as they did for our parents generations.  Further, due to the rapidly changing society of technology, there will be different futures emerging for our students in terms of what jobs will be available. We have opportunities now for students to engage in a variety of learning experiences and a variety of literacies that we can promote to help them navigate uncertainty and follow their passions – literally right at our finger tips! Indeed, it is a very exciting time.

What do students need to succeed?

As I consider what it is that our students will need to succeed in their futures, I always come back to ‘Higher Order Thinking Skills’.  Without a doubt, these are the skills that future generations need to count on to succeed in any job, career, or learning environment.

Knowledge construction, metacognitive elements of learning, reflection, critical thinking, flexible decision making, imagination and creativity are just some of the skills that will be necessary.

Technology has come so far that it is so intuitive for anyone to use, but, the higher order thinking skills still need to be in place to make the most out of these learning opportunities and technologies. eLearning and blended learning environments will continue to grow, and therefore, we need to consider how to apply higher order thinking skills to the eLearning environment.

eLearning & Blended Learning

I had the amazing opportunity to be a part of a workshop at ORTK12 where we co-created an iBook on eLearning. What a brilliant idea to bring together educators to help describe this as something beautiful that can be presented to parents, teachers, students, administrators to understand these new virtual learning spaces that we can create for our students.

I look forward to these new spaces and places for learning, and more importantly learning how to effectively integrate the higher order thinking skills into these new paradigms of learning!

Deborah McCallum

Educator and Learner investigating the intersection between Knowledge Building, Indigenous perspectives, Edtech, Digital Citizenship & New Pedagogies for the 21st Century. Desire2Learn Instructor for AQ & OntarioLearn Highered; Teacher-Librarian Specialist; Science & Technology; Counselling Pychology, GD.

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“Being an independent practitioner is inconsistent with professional practice.”

Brandon Grasley's Blog

wall.jpg by frenchbyte on MorgueFile Don’t go it alone. Image from frenchbyte via MorgueFile

The title quote is from Catherine Montreuil, Director of Education for Bruce-Grey Catholic District School Board. She said this during her keynote presentation at On The Rise K-12: Enhancing Digital Learning on April 2, 2014.

This has really stayed with me. I’ve thought before about the moral imperative I believe teachers have to use technology in their teaching, and to be a reflective practitioner. I’ve always thought it a basic requirement to keep up-to-date with our best thinking around instructional strategies and assessment approaches.

But I’m not sure I’ve ever really thought about it quite they way she put it: that it’s actually unprofessional to be disconnected.

I believe you can connect in any way you like. Connecting with others in your school is a good first step, but the insular nature of schools can prevent you from seeing…

View original post 97 more words

Day 1: Your Voice in Connected Learning Professional Practice

Written and shared by
Mark W. Carbone
Blog: http://blog.markwcarbone.ca/
Twitter: @markwcarbone
Google Plus: +markwcarbone

I recently enjoyed a family trip to China in the context of  “the journey home”  for my adopted daughter.   The trip in of itself was simply amazing. I enjoyed going back, seeing the changes and once again experiencing the culture in such an amazing and historic country.

 

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Given the 1997 timing of my first trip we essentially survived on landline calling cards as public internet access and early versions of email were just springing up around the globe.  On this 2014 trip, of course the internet as matured and there are many amazing and often free collaborative tools available,  so in that sense the trip felt less isolated.

At the same time,  I had a chance to experience the “internet culture” in a much more locked down and filtered government controlled environment.  Tools that we celebrate, use and promote here in North America were simply not available.   Most social media tools were not available including Twitter, Facebook and Google Plus.  Of the Google suite of tools, only gmail and search were available and even these had seemingly limited use.  Gmail seemed to respond very slowly and not all search result  web links were actively available.  I also noted the some, but not all, blogging sites were blocked.  Facetime and Skype worked OK (band width dependent).

The notion of public free wifi as we experience here at locations such as McDonald’s, Tim Horton’s and Starbucks etc. was not wide spread. Yes, the wifi was free but you needed to text your phone number to a service in order to obtain an access code which would be texted back to you.  This is a very different approach to walk in free access for any device culture that is enjoyed in North America.

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Here in Canada, we are blessed with a very open culture and full access to a wide variety of web tools. The bottom line is YOU have a voice – and a choice of tools to use.  Please do not take take this for granted.  Leverage this privilege! Take time and make time to connect with other educators to develop your network and make your thinking visible by sharing your learnings and reflections.  Ask questions,  pose scenarios,  collaborate.  Give yourself a rich experience by starting a blog today!

Related Resources:
Reference 1:  Perspective from the Wall
Reference 2: #OSSEMOOC 30 days of learning

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