Tag Archives: research

February 10: OSSEMOOC presents “Teacher as Researcher” with Dean Shareski

Upcoming OSSEMOOC live conversations:

 

February 10:

Dean Shareski:  “Teacher as Researcher”

In a world of constant flux and change, waiting for the white paper on “best practice” may not be the best way for teachers to stay innovative and provide the best experience for students. What is the role of teacher as researcher? What does or could it look like to be in a state of perpetual experimentation?

February 10, 2015 8 p.m. EST – 9 p.m. EST

Please use this link to enter the synchronous meeting room any time after 7:30 p.m.:
OSSEMOOC presents Dean Shareski.

Please sign up for this event using the form below:

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Is Linear the Right Approach?

Many of our conversations around eLearning in Ontario involve the idea of online course “content”.  As schools make plans for online learning next year, teachers want to know, “Is there a course?”.

Years ago, when I was teaching full time online, my principal often said, “We are not in the business of content delivery, we are in the business of learning!”.

In one conversation about content this year, a teacher said to me, “Well, wouldn’t you just have the students build their own content?”.

This article in my zite feed caught my attention this morning:

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As we think about how our students learn, how does it impact our thinking about what online learning should look like?

Shared by Donna Miller Fry (@fryed)

Building Content Knowledge: Collaborate and Curate

Sylvia Rosenthal-Tolisano (@Langwitches) is one of my favourite bloggers.  She does visually represent the learning in incredible ways, and I have a number of her posters hanging in my classroom. BUT, it is her teaching through her blogs that I so appreciate.

In this post, “Building Content Knowledge: Collaborate and Curate”, she includes video, images, and annotations to help her reader really “see” the Digital Learning Farm (Alan November) in action!

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Tolisano never forgets the role of technology in the teaching and learning cycle. Skill-building in reading for meaning, gathering information, and note making–all key components in the research process–are front and centre here without the traditional teacher lecture and notes for students and in ways that support students’ acquisition of information literacy skills.

Take some time to explore Langwitches’ Blog. It will be worth your while.

Shared by: Julie Balen, High School English Teacher,  Wikwemikong Board of Education (@jacbalen)